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Posted June 19, 2011 by Jennifer Lam (Jenius) in Recipes
 
 

Nem chua – Vietnamese fermented pork rolls

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My mother was making nem chua (pronounced: nem joo) last week so I quickly took the opportunity to document the process of making this much loved snack.
For those who aren’t familiar with nem chua, it is finely ground pork mince that is fermented, studded with peppercorns, Vietnamese mint, raw garlic and slices of fresh chilli, and then wrapped in a banana leaf.

nem chua ingredients

It tastes sweet, salty, sour and spicy. Our homemade versions are packed with extra garlic and chilli so they’re even more pungent.
Shapes and sizes vary from small long sticks to squares and sometimes, even in large containers full, where you’d slice and serve as much or as little as you need.
Nem chua is typically considered a snack. In Sydney, you should be able to find ready-made ones in Vietnamese bakeries (they add it in banh mi bread rolls) or in the refrigerated section of Asian grocers, and of course along the streets of Cabramatta where old ladies sell their homemade versions.

nem chua - vietnamese fermented pork rolls

In Vietnam, some regions honour their nem chua recipe so much that it gets named after the district and takes on a life of its own. There are varietal flavours in regions such as Lai Vung (Dong Thap Province), Thu Duc (Ho Chi Minh City), Ninh Hoa (Khanh Hoa Province), Dong Ba (Hue City), Thanh Hoa City, Uoc Le Village (Ha Dong Province), Ve Village (Hanoi) and Quang Yen (Quang Ninh Province), where they may replace certain ingredients with things such as guava leaves, fig leaves or powdered grilled rice.
My father tells me that his all time favourite is Nem Chua Thu Duc so I’ll have to make sure I get myself back to Vietnam for a taste of it soon!
In the meantime, I’m extremely delighted to have learned this homemade version.

jennifer aka jenius making nem chua

Nem Chua (Vietnamese fermented pork rolls
Makes 20

Ingredients
1kg lean pork mince (ask the butcher to grind it twice further)
2 packs Lobo nam powder seasoning mix
1 tablespoon fish sauce
1 teaspoon ground pepper
1 teaspoon whole peppercorns
1 bulb garlic, peeled and thinly sliced
100g pork skin strips (if frozen, defrost, rinse and dry)
1 bunch Vietnamese mint
Chillies, to your taste
Plastic wrap
Banana leaves
Elastic bands
Tissue paper
Method
In a mixing bowl, combine the pork, fish sauce, ground pepper, peppercorns, pork skin strips and half the garlic. Using your hands, combine the ingredients.
Add the contents of the curing mix packets and knead until sticky.
To wrap, cut a piece of plastic wrap and place a few Vietnamese mint leaves, garlic and chilli.

making nem chua - Vietnamese mint, garlic and chilli

Add the meat mixture.

making nem chua - adding the minced pork

Roll it firmly to your desired shape and fold the edges of the plastic wrap over to seal.

making nem chua -rolling it up

To prepare the banana leaves for wrapping, cut off the central rib and trim off the edges. To make the leaves more flexible, slightly heat in warm water, in the oven for a few minutes or over a small flame but do not burn. Wipe the leaves clean then wrap a piece of tissue paper or napkin around the nem chua, followed by a banana leaf.

making nem chua - another layer of tissue followed by banana leaf

Tie together with an elastic band and package tightly in a plastic container to ensure they keep its shape.
Cure for 24 – 48 hours before serving.

making nem chua -the finished parcels

Consume within one week.

nem chua - vietnamese fermented pork snacks


Jennifer Lam (Jenius)

 
Jennifer is the founding blogger of I Ate My Way Through (originally, Jenius.com.au). Having grown up in a family where food was always at the centre of all celebrations, family events and milestones, Jen is obsessed with capturing irresistible flavours and stories from myriad cultures. A lover of the finer things in life, as well as cheap eats, her blogging ethos is all about empowering people to have good food and invigorating adventures - because life is too short for mediocre meals or dull travel. Her hobbies are breakfast, lunch and dinner. She's globally curious, passionate about female entrepreneurship, is a soy chai latte fanatic, and loves vintage, dressmaking and photography.